Annie's Book Stop of Worcester

The little bookstore that's bigger on the inside

 

 

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is very happy to shine our Friday spotlight on Naturalist and Nature author Jim Arnosky.  Jim has written and illustrated 104 books on nature subjects and has illustrated 46 other books written by various authors. He has over 142 books published world wide. They have been translated into 10 languages and published in Braille.

 

He has been honored by the Washington Post and Children’s Literary Guild as non-fiction author of the year, given the first ever lifetime achievement award for excellence in science illustration by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is the recipient of the Christopher Medal, Orbis Pictus Honor and many Outstanding Science Books award from the National Science Teachers Association. Jim’s books on fishing are included in the International Game Fishing Hall of Fame Library.

 

In 1987, he wrote and starred in his own PBS series Drawing From Nature (aired national and now available to be streamed world- wide on VPBS From the Archives/ Drawing From Nature with Jim Arnosky. He also co-created another national PBS Series Backyard Safari which featured his book character – a nature guide named Crinkleroot featured in 13 of Jim’s books. Jim and his work have been featured on the popular show Reading Rainbow series.

 

Jim, where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester–though they should totally check here first!)

 

Besides in all the wonderful independent book stores, like Annies Book Stop, my books are available from Amazon and also Goodread in their Jim Arnosky Classic Collection.

 

They are also directly available from Putnam’s, Sterling, Scholastic, Simon and Schuster, Richard Owens, Onion River Press and other publishers.

 

 

What is your favorite part of being a writer?  Of the whole writing and publishing process?  What do you think has been your greatest lesson in the journey thus far?

 

My favorite part of being a writer is the act of writing, living in a book from day to day and having it develop in my mind, keeping it to myself, like having a shiny new coin in your pocket and feeling richer because it’s there.

 

 

What piece of advice would you want to share with other writers?

 

When the time is right to share, I love working with my editor. Some of my editors I have worked with for years and on many books. We learn how each of us thinks and understand criticism as a professional not personal thing. A good editor can get a writer through difficult times in the creative process.

 

The best piece of advice I can offer other writers is to write every day and keep quiet about what you are writing. Talking about a work in progress only weakens its power.

 

 

How important has the New England setting been to your writing?

 

Living in New England has had a peaceful effect on my work. I’ve created over 90 of my books in the 46 years we have lived here on the farm, as well as worked in creating a PBS series with Lancit Media featuring my character Crinkleroot and another PBS series based on my now classic book “Drawing From Nature” in which I starred.

 

 

 

 

 

What else can we expect from you in the near future?

 

I don’t discuss books in progress and my newest book is one that we have just begun to submit to publishers. Discussing it in an interview would, at this stage be presumptuous and worse, bad luck.

 

 

What is/are your passions when you’re not writing? How do you make time for your non-writing hobbies/things you love?

 

When I’m not working, I’m outdoors. My favorite activities are boating, fishing, and tending the fields (mowing). I make time for these things the same way I make time for writing or painting. I do each when I can take enough time to do each well and I enjoy myself while doing the things I love which, of course, includes my work, either writing or creating art.

 

 

What does your writing space look like? What do you need to have around you while writing or editing?

 

I write in long hand, with the pad on my lap, while I’m sitting on a comfortable chair. No desk. I am at the drawing board or easel for hours when I’m making the art for my books. Writing is more casual and less demanding than sitting at a desk or perched on a stool at my easel. A lot of my writing is done spontaneously while I’m doing something else. I keep a small notepad in my pocket for these writing moments.

 

 

While you’re writing, do you prefer music, silence, other? Please elaborate!

 

When I’m painting I listen to music and often apply brushstrokes in rhythm with the song or instruments in the music. When I’m writing, I’m oblivious to my surrounding and can write even while a baseball game is on TV.

 

 

Writers very often have furry or feathered or otherwise non-human companions to “help” them through their work.  Do you? What do you have? How do they “help” (or, “not-help”) with your writing?

 

The only animals we have ever had were our sheep during the decades that we raised them and the dogs that protected the flock. They were all lovely sweet dogs and having them around inspired some of my writing.

 

 

Jim, thanks so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to answer so many of our questions! Below are just a few of Jim’s great Children’s books!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week, new arrivals abound with tales of Hollywood celebrities, Tinseltown personalities you might be interested in. Two of them are involved with music, and their lives are chronicled for all to see. Those are in the biographies UNPROTECTED: A MEMOIR by Billy Porter (also a book of LGBTQ interest), and MADE IN HOLLYWOOD: ALL ACCESS WITH THE GO-GO’S by Gina Schock. The rest of the memoirs/biographies from media personages are ACT LIKE YOU GOT SOME SENSE AND OTHER THINGS MY DAUGHTERS TAUGHT ME by Jamie Foxx, THE WAY I HEARD IT by Mike Rowe, BAGGAGE: TALES FROM A FULLY PACKED LIFE by Alan Cumming and GOING THERE by Katie Couric. There are two other books on the list this week that are NOT biographies, and they are DEAR SANTA: A NOVEL by Debbie Macomber (Holiday fiction) and FILIPINX: HERITAGE RECIPES FROM THE DIASPORA by  Angela Dimayuga and  Ligaya Mishan, (a Filipino cookbook).

 

 

 

 

As Always, Thank you for making our shelves your destination.

 

 

 

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is very happy to shine our Friday spotlight on author David Ezra Stein. David is a Caldecott-Honor illustrator and author, and has written and illustrated over twenty children’s books, including INTERRUPTING CHICKEN, DINOSAUR KISSES, I’M MY OWN DOG, and many other award-winning picture books. His book LEAVES, is the winner of an Ezra Jack Keats New Writer award.

 

 

Where can people find your work, David?  (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester–though they should totally check here first!)

 

Wherever books are sold.

 

 

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?

 

 

www.davidezrastein.com

 

@_davidezrastein TWITTER

 

@davidezrastein INSTAGRAM

 

David Ezra Stein FACEBOOK

 

 

 

For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you do?  What can readers expect from you next (Latest cover, book, comic, movie, etc?) or what is the last thing you worked on?

 

 

I write and illustrate warm and funny picture books for kids and adults to share! My latest (forthcoming) book is Interrupting Chicken: Cookies for Breakfast, which comes out October 12 from Candlewick Press. It’s the third in the series of books about the little red chicken and her papa.

 

 

What was the inspiration for Interrupting Chicken: Cookies for Breakfast? What were the steps you took to bring it from initial inspiration to the finished piece of work?

 

 

I often write ideas for new Chicken stories in my sketchbook, and one day I came up with the idea that Chicken would be interrupting nursery rhymes by putting cookies in them. For example, Hickory hickory dock—I sure like cookies a lot! And Papa would be telling her that she couldn’t have cookies. This made me laugh, and I wanted to do it as a book.

 

 

What was the biggest challenge putting out Interrupting Chicken: Cookies for Breakfast?  How did you overcome that challenge?

 

 

The challenge was how to set up the funny nursery rhyme interruptions. What were Papa and Chicken doing together? Why couldn’t she have cookies? Finally I realized that it would be very early in the morning and she would be jumping into Papa’s bed. Too early for cookies!

 

 

 

 

 

 

How important has the New England setting been to your work?

 

 

I’ve vacationed in Cape Cod for most of my life. I absolutely love the landscape, the grasses, the pitch pines, the animals, the ponds, and the Bay. The setting has made its way into several of my books: Hush, Little Bunny has wild bunnies in a Cape Cod like landscape. My books Leaves and Honey are also set in a garden like setting that is inspired by the Cape. My book Tad and Dad  is set in my favorite kettle pond.

 

 

 

 

 

What is/are your passions when you’re not creating your works? How do you make time for your non-art based hobbies/things you love?

 

 

I am really enjoying opera singing! I’ve been studying voice for 6 years now just for fun, and I’ve realized that opera is a lot like books in that it tells a story, and has great characters and lots of drama. Nowadays, with zoom lessons, I can just put down my brush and sing right in my art studio! But I do miss singing with others in person.

 

 

Artists very often have furry or feathered or otherwise non-human companions to “help” them through their work.  Do you? What do you have? How do they “help” (or, “not-help”) with your creations?

 

 

We have a rabbit named BunBun who is a white half-dwarf rabbit. He is a house rabbit, which means he gets to hop around our apartment. He loves to lie on the floor near me when I’m working. He has a fuzzy red blanket that he lies on all day! He’s most active in the morning and at night. He loves to be petted. When he’s really happy, he does a little dance move called a binkie. He’s very funny and cute.

 

 

David, thanks so much for taking the time out of your vacation to answer these questions for us!

 

 

As you can probably tell by the title, this week’s new arrivals include a wonderful selection of mystery/thriller books that are almost guaranteed to keep you at the edge of your seat, from THE JUDGE’S LIST by John Grisham, to A LINE TO KILL: A NOVEL (A HAWTHORNE AND HOROWITZ MYSTERY BOOK 3), OUT OF TIME (THE DELTA DEVLIN NOVELS BOOK 3) by Matthew Mather, and AS THE WICKED WATCH: THE FIRST JORDAN MANNING NOVEL by Tamron Hall. If those don’t do it, perhaps BETTER OFF DEAD: A JACK REACHER NOVEL by Lee Child will. The tasty treats would have to come from our great cookbooks, THE PIONEER WOMAN COOKS : RECIPES FROM AN ACCIDENTAL COUNTRY GIRL by Ree Drummond, COOKING AT HOME: OR, HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING ABOUT RECIPES (AND LOVE MY MICROWAVE): A COOKBOOK  by David Chang and Priya Krishna, and CRAVINGS: ALL TOGETHER: RECIPES TO LOVE : A COOKBOOK by Chrissy Teigen. There are also some books for media lovers: THE STORY OF MARVEL STUDIOS: THE MAKING OF THE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE  by Tara Bennett, Paul Terry, et. al. and a personal favorite, BEST WISHES, WARMEST REGARDS: THE STORY OF SCHITT’S CREEK by Daniel Levy.

 

 

 

As always, thank you for making our shelves your destination.

 

 

 

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is very happy to shine our Friday spotlight on Science Fiction author  Becky Chambers. Becky, can you please tell us briefly a little about yourself and your writing? How would you like us to introduce you?

 

 

My name’s Becky Chambers, and I’m a science fiction author based in Northern California. I’m best known for my Hugo Award-winning Wayfarers series, the most recent of which is The Galaxy, and the Ground Within. I also have a new novella out this year, entitled A Psalm for the Wild-Built, which is the first of my Monk and Robot books.

 

Where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester–though they should totally check here first!)

 

 

You can find my work anywhere you like to buy books. Support your local indies!

 

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?

 

 

You can learn more about me and my work at otherscribbles.com. I’m not on social media, but if you would like updates about book launches and events, you can sign up for my newsletter via my website.

 

For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you write?  What can readers expect from The Galaxy, and the Ground Within?

 

 

I will be the first person to tell you that if you’re looking for a big crunchy plot, my work is not for you. I tell character-driven science fiction that focuses on everyday moments and ordinary lives. I love to sink my teeth into the little, seemingly inconsequential things that pull people together (or push them apart). I try to make fantastical places feel familiar and tangible, and I love to invent new species and cultures. I want the future to feel like something to be welcomed, rather than something to fear.

The Galaxy, and the Ground Within is very much in line with all of that. It’s the fourth and final book in my Wayfarers series, but like all the others, it exists as a standalone story, so you can jump in anywhere. It’s chock-full of aliens, it’s very quiet and contemplative, and I hope it’ll be good company for anybody who picks it up.

 

 

 

 

What piece of advice would you want to share with other writers?

 

 

Take care of yourself. It’s true that writing is hard work, and that you have to be very disciplined in order to finish a big project like a book, but beware of romanticizing burnout. I don’t write everyday. I take naps. I eat my vegetables. I make plenty of time for rest and hobbies. Always remember that you are a complex animal that needs a lot of maintenance, and you can’t sustain creative output for long if you don’t make that your top priority. Writing is awesome, but you are the most important thing.

 

 

What does your writing space look like? What do you need to have around you while writing or editing?

 

 

I have an office at home that I am very fond of. I do my writing on a laptop in a big upholstered chair. I don’t know why, but I write best when I can just lose all sense of my body, so being comfy is key. I also have a standing desk with a dual-monitor setup where I do everything that isn’t writing from scratch – editing, emails, doing virtual events, that kind of stuff. My walls are jam-packed with art, and I have a shelf full of plants above the desk. I’ve also got a bookshelf where I keep all my notebooks, the copies of my books I use for reading, and various knickknacks. There’s a closet in here as well, and I painted over the doors with whiteboard paint. That’s always covered in notes. There’s a balcony outside, with a glass sliding door. I’ve got redwoods out back, so they wave at me all day. Post-it notes, pens, a notebook, and either a pot of tea or my water bottle are always on hand. Chocolate makes a frequent appearance as well.

 

 

While you’re writing, do you prefer music, silence, other? Please elaborate!

 

 

It depends on what I’m working on, and what mood I’m in. Silence often suits me well, but sometimes my brain needs a little bit extra input. I can’t listen to music with lyrics when I write, so I only listen to instrumental music. If there’s any vocals in it, it has to be in a language I don’t speak. Electronic ambient music and lo-fi beats are common choices for me, as are video game soundtracks. I sometimes go for something classical, but only in really specific instances. If I’m really having a hard time focusing, I might go for nature sounds or white noise, but those are the big guns.

 

 

Thanks for taking the time out of your schedule to answer these questions for us, Becky!

 

 

 

If reality is what you enjoy, this week’s new arrivals should be to your liking. There are six non-fiction books that have arrived on our shelves, including MAJOR LABELS: A HISTORY OF POPULAR MUSIC IN SEVEN GENRES by Kelefa Sanneh a book about music; NAILED IT!: BAKING CHALLENGES, a Cookbook; THE BOYS: A MEMOIR OF HOLLYWOOD AND FAMILY by Ron and Clint Howard, a biography; HOOKED: HOW CRAFTING SAVED MY LIFE by Sutton Foster, a biography; ON ANIMALS by Susan Orlean , a book about nature; and TO RESCUE THE REPUBLIC: ULYSSES S. GRANT, THE FRAGILE UNION, AND THE CRISIS OF 1876 by Bret Baier and Catherine Whitney, a historical biography. There are also two genre books in the mix (as well as others), a Mystery by John leCarre, SILVERVIEW, and a fantasy by Sharon Lynn Fisher, THE WARRIER POET.

 

As always, thank you for making our shelves your destination.

Photo Credit: Steve Parke Photography

 

 

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is very happy to shine our Friday spotlight on historical fiction and thriller author Alma Katsu. Alma, can you please tell us briefly a little about yourself and your writing? How would you like us to introduce you?

 

I’ve written six novels. I’m proud to say that my first book was published when I was 50, as I was wrapping up a long career elsewhere. That book is The Taker and it was a Booklist top ten debut of the year. I’m mostly known for writing historical fiction with elements of horror or fantasy, but my most recent book is a spy thriller.

 

 

Where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester–though they should totally check here first!)

 

You can find my books just about everywhere, and if you find a store that doesn’t carry them—ask!

 

 

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?

 

My website is almakatsubooks.com. There is a ton of information there. Use the pop-up to subscribe to my newsletter: that’s the best way to hear the latest news and when books go on sale.

 

 

For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you write?  What can readers expect from your books?

 

My novels tend to combine historical events with a horror or supernatural element. My most well-known book is probably THE HUNGER, which is a reimagining of the story of the Donner Party. It was named one of NPR’s 100 favorite horror novels and was an international award-winner. The next historical horror, THE FERVOR, comes out April 2022, and is about the Japanese internment.

 

My most recent book is RED WIDOW, a spy novel. I drew on a 30+ year career in intelligence, working at CIA and NSA to write this book. I’m really proud of Red Widow as I think it addresses stuff about the career that doesn’t come up in most spy novels such as what it’s like for women in the field. It’s gotten great reviews, been a NYT Editors’ Choice, and is in development at FOX for a TV series.

 

 

 

 

What kind of research went into Red Widow?  What is your favorite research story? What cool facts and findings didn’t make it into the book, but you loved discovering?

 

As you can imagine, when you’re writing about the Donner Party or the sinking of the Titanic, you have to do a lot of research. Luckily, I was basically a researcher for 30 years for my day job as an intelligence analyst, so I love research. No matter how well you think you know a famous incident, there are always new things to discover that will amaze or surprise you. For instance, I read thumbnail biographies of all 2300 passengers and crew on the Titanic while preparing for The Deep and came away with a deeper appreciation for that era.

 

 

What was the biggest challenge in writing and putting out Red Widow?  How did you overcome that challenge?

 

The challenge with RED WIDOW has less to do with writing and more to do with the business end of things. I’d established myself in horror/supernatural and, for various reasons, decided not to use a pseudonym for Red Widow. Would readers follow me to a new genre? When you’re known for one genre, how do you attract readers from a completely different one? Would it be confusing for new readers? While I’ve been pretty lucky so far with my base, it’s still a challenge that I haven’t quite cracked yet.

 

 

 

 

 

How important has the New England setting been to your writing?

 

New England played a big role in my first three books, The Taker Trilogy. That story’s timeline starts in the late 1700s. I grew up near Concord, Massachusetts, around all those Colonial-era houses, and I think I underestimated how much the history seeped into my subconscious. I’ve lived in the Washington, DC area for nearly 40 years now but try to get back to New England as often as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are there any groups, clubs, or organizations that you would recommend to other writers that have helped you in your career?

 

If you write horror, you should join the Horror Writers Association (horror.org). You won’t find a nicer, more supportive group of people anywhere, honestly. There are regional chapters, too, if you’re looking for a more in-person experience.

 

If you write stories about espionage, you should consider Mystery Writers of America (mysterywriters.org) and International Thriller Writers (thrillerwriters.org). Both are great, supportive organizations for the writer who’s just starting out. International Thriller Writers is best known for their annual conference, Thrillerfest, which is held in NYC and is considered a must-attend for everyone in the field.

 

 

Thanks so much, Alma, for taking the time to answer our questions for us!

 

 

 

          This week we have a plethora of publications to tell you about! Several superb literature/ fiction books crossed our path, including A CARNIVAL OF SNACKERY: DIARIES (2003-2020) by David Sedaris, CROSSROADS by Jonathan Franzen, THE LINCOLN HIGHWAY: A NOVEL by Amor Towles and WE ARE NOT LIKE THEM by Christine Pride. Sensational speculative fiction stories we have include SISTERSONG  by Lucy Holland, THE LAST GRADUATE by Naomi Novik (both Fantasy), and THE DEATH OF JANE LAWRENCE by Caitlin Starling (Horror). Brilliant Biographies by Stevie Van Zandt (UNREQUITED INFATUATIONS: A MEMOIR) (Music), Dave Grohl (THE STORYTELLER) (Music) and Stanley Tucci (TASTE: MY LIFE THROUGH FOOD) (Cooking) have bedecked our business, as have mind-boggling mysteries such as THE MAN WHO DIED TWICE: A THURSDAY MURDER CLUB MYSTERY by Richard Osman and APRIL IN SPAIN: A NOVEL by John Banville. One rockin’ romance book that is present on our shelves is OUT OF LOVE: A NOVEL by Hazel Hayes. And for non-fiction enthusiasts, TECH PANIC: WHY WE SHOULDN’T FEAR FACEBOOK AND THE FUTURE by Robby Soave rounds out our list.

 

 

 

As always, thank you for making our shelves your destination.

Patty and the staff at Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester

It’s no secret that Autumn is our favorite season here at Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester, the little bookstore that’s bigger on the inside! The weather is cooler and crisper, giving readers the perfect excuse to get comfortable with books. 

We’re always restocking our store sections with pre-read books for adults, teens, and children, and to make room for that restocking, we’ve placed quite a few titles on markdowns for our Sidewalk Sale carts.  Currently there’s one dedicated to middle reader and teen school reading titles, one dedicated to literary fiction and biographies, and one that’s a mix of romances, mysteries, Westerns, and vintage pocket paperbacks.

The Sidewalk Sale carts will remain outdoors in temperate weather between now and December 1st, or between now and the first snowfall, whichever comes first, before they move back indoors for the Winter months.


This week, Sunday September 26th through Saturday, October 2nd, is Banned Books Week.  We have associated merchandise for sale that supports literacy advocacy.

For more information, check out https://bannedbooksweek.org.


We continue to monitor everything related to COVID-19 and are complying with the latest regulations regarding safety and capacity. The City of Worcester has mandated that facemasks be worn in all public indoor spaces, and thus we must ask that all customers and employees be masked while shopping and working at ABSW. This means that we will be severely limiting our plans for in-store events.

  • Spinning Yarns remains on hiatus until Spring 2022.
  • Rather than hosting an in-person craft session on the Monday holiday on October 11th, we will have “pick-up crafts” – pre-assembled kits with three different kinds of paper harvest crafts inside, for ages four and up. We will be giving those out starting at 10am on October 11th to the first fifteen customers who request one!
  • The Rainbow Readers Book Group *will* next meet here on Saturday, October 16th at 6pm, but will be limited to ten persons. Please RSVP on their Facebook page.
  • We will be hosting local children’s author Julia Kneeland on Saturday, October 23rd at 2pm. She’ll be reading from and signing her picture book JIG GETS LOST. As space is limited, please RSVP on the event page on Facebook.
  • Our Spoooooky Storytime event in late October and our annual DOCTOR WHO all-day celebration just before Thanksgiving will now be virtual rather than in-person. Details are still forthcoming.
  • We are finalizing arrangements for an in-person presentation by the Worcester Mineral Club for Small Business Saturday on November 27, 2021.

Please keep an eye on our Facebook page and our website for updates concerning events.


Our October publisher specials are starting to arrive on our shelves; so far we have:

  • THE OCTOBER COUNTRY by Ray Bradbury
  • THE LIAR OF RED VALLEY by Walter Goodwater
  • MY HEART IS A CHAINSAW by Stephen Graham Jones

This month’s specials reflect our regional trade show discounts are are priced 44% off of retail prices, not just 42%.

Speaking of regional trade shows, our thanks and admiration go out to all the booksellers, authors and publisher sales representatives who met with us virtually at this year’s NEIBA Fall Conference. We’ve worked on and off with the New England Independent Booksellers Association for nearly a quarter of a century, between being employed at the old Tatnuck Bookseller on Chandler Street in Worcester and taking over this Annie’s Book Stop franchise outlet in 2010. Everyone associated with NEIBA is a star in our eyes, and we thank you for letting us be a part of this conference.

One topic of discussion that came up over and over again at the Fall Conference was the worrying state of the global supply chain due to the pandemic. The transit of books from printer to publishers to distributors and wholesalers to bookstores has been impacted just like every other shipped commodity. We here at ABSW appreciate the patience of our customers in dealing with these unprecedented delays; know that we’re continuing to work to get titles onto our shelves and into your hands as fast as we can.


Have you checked out our YouTube channel?  Are you a subscriber?  You won’t want to miss our fresh content!

Did you know we have dedicated playlists of our author interviews, readings, and Q & A sessions, organized by genre?  Take a stroll and give a listen to our many special guests! Upcoming interviews will include graphic novelist Bree Paulsen, whose debut work GARLIC AND THE VAMPIRE has won our hearts with both its story and its illustrations, and long-time favorite Craig Johnson, author of the LONGMIRE mystery series.

Please help us spread the word about these wonderful creators!


Thanks, as always, for making our shelves your destination.

—Patty and the staff at Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester / Tower Books

 

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to shine our Friday spotlight on Thriller author Stuart Woods. Stuart gave us permission to use his web site to gather the answers to some of our questions, and use them in this spotlight. Stuart’s latest released paperback book is Hit List, (A Stone Barrington novel), and newest released hardcover novel will be Double Jeopardy (also Stone Barrington) on March 23rd. He has several other novels due to be released later this year, including a new Teddy Fay novel, Jackpot on June 1.

 

 

 

Stuart, can you please tell us briefly a little about yourself and your writing career?

 

 

 My mother taught me to read the year before I went to school, and she did a good job. I became a voracious reader as a child, reading Mark Twain and Dickens and a lot of horse and dog stories from the Junior Literary Guild, then I moved up to my mother’s Literary Guild selections. That has to be the basis of my career. One learns to write by reading, and by the time I was nine or ten, I wanted to write.

 

 

 

Where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester–though they should totally check here first!)

 

 

The complete list of my books is published in the front of every book, in reverse chronological order. (Some editions of some paperbacks may not adhere to the proper order.) Alternatively, you can go to the Books page of my website, where they are listed in reverse chronological order with pictures of their covers and the dust jacket copy. You can then print out a checklist, take it to any bookstore, and buy all the books! 

 

 

What draws you to the particular genre or style that you write? What do you think draws readers to these kinds of books?

 

 

Murder and crime are depressing only if they’re happening to you. And they’re among the most compelling human dramas, if you like that sort of thing.

 

 

What is your favorite part of being a writer?  Of the whole writing and publishing process?  What do you think has been your greatest lesson in the journey thus far?

 

 

The freedom. I’m as much my own master as anyone can be, without being the master of others. I can write anywhere—all I need is an hour of solitude and a computer, and I can write a chapter. Since my work is portable, I can live anywhere I like.

 

 

What else can we expect from you in the near future?

 

 

 My publishers have asked me to write five books a year, including one cowritten novel, so there will be five new books every year for as long as I can stand it.

 

 

 

What is/are your passions other than writing?

 

 

In the future, I’m going to be on the water more, in both Key West and Maine, in Indian Summer, my new Hinckley T38 motor vessel, and aboard Enticer, a 1935 Trumpy motor yacht of 85 feet, in which I am a partner.

 

 

Writers very often have furry or feathered or otherwise non-human companions to “help” them through their work.  Do you? What do you have? How do they “help” (or, “not-help”) with your writing?

 

 

 I have been married to Jeanmarie Woods since 2013, and we share our life with my fourth Labrador retriever, named Fred. (I name all my dogs Fred.) 

 

 

Stuart, thanks so much for allowing us the use of your web site for responding to our questions!

 

 

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